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  • Using Earned Value Analysis to Manage Projects White Paper
    Dr Mark Gershon PMP Temple University Published date February 27 2012 Any curriculum on the subject of Project Management explains that there are three major tools that are needed to manage projects three tools that are not used in other types of operations These three tools are the Work Breakdown Structure WBS Critical Path Method CPM Scheduling and Earned Value Analysis The WBS provides the scope of the project detailing each task required to be performed Since it is very difficult to conduct a project without a list of tasks that need to be completed virtually everyone in project management used the WBS The CPM schedules the tasks from the WBS putting them on a calendar to provide a plan for carrying out the project This plan or schedule is usually illustrated with a Gantt chart Again no organization would allow a project manager to spend their money or use their resources without such a plan so again virtually everyone in project management uses this CPM tool Earned Value Analysis is not a planning tool It is a tool for managing the work during the Execution phase of a project It is a Control tool We would think that every

    Original URL path: http://www.temple.sg/executive-education/white-papers/using-earned-value-analysis-manage-projects-white-paper (2012-12-22)
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  • Using Earned Value Analysis to Manage Projects White Paper
    three tools are the Work Breakdown Structure WBS Critical Path Method CPM Scheduling and Earned Value Analysis The WBS provides the scope of the project detailing each task required to be performed Since it is very difficult to conduct a project without a list of tasks that need to be completed virtually everyone in project management used the WBS The CPM schedules the tasks from the WBS putting them on a calendar to provide a plan for carrying out the project This plan or schedule is usually illustrated with a Gantt chart Again no organization would allow a project manager to spend their money or use their resources without such a plan so again virtually everyone in project management uses this CPM tool Earned Value Analysis is not a planning tool It is a tool for managing the work during the Execution phase of a project It is a Control tool We would think that every project needs a good Control tool and every project manager would use it But most project managers and most organizations do not use Earned Value analysis Click on the link below to download the full white paper Link to whitepaper Using Earned Value Analysis

    Original URL path: http://www.temple.sg/print/executive-education/white-papers/using-earned-value-analysis-manage-projects-white-paper (2012-12-22)
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  • Global Branding Strategies White Paper
    Education Workshops Information Sessions Knowledge Leadership Series KLS Past Events Initial Application Form Ambassador Referral Global Branding Strategies White Paper Home Author Anthony Di Benedetto Ph D Temple University Published date January 24 2012 One of the most important decisions at the time of a new product launch is selecting the brand Branding a product represents a promise made by the firm to the customer about the product s value or quality Effective branding differentiates competing products and contributes to the mental image the customer has about the product and the firm It is easy to see the value in familiar brands such as Coca Cola Toyota Nike or Apple Marketing people refer to brand equity as the added brand value that results from careful investment in brand marketing by the firm and is created over time by the relationship between the brand and customer Brand equity is valuable to the firm as it builds customer loyalty and repurchase and gets greater reseller support thus making future marketing and product launch activities much more cost efficient Branding for the domestic market is challenging enough Names must be chosen that communicate the physical or sensory qualities of the brand that are clear relevant and not irritating or insulting that might be transferable to a line of products in the future and that support the overall new product strategy Few if any brands score high on all these dimensions But when developing a branding strategy for the global market the branding decision becomes even more complicated In addition to all of the above the firm must now consider whether it should standardize the brand name across all markets or use two or more regional brand names And this decision in not made in a vacuum but must be tied to the global

    Original URL path: http://www.temple.sg/executive-education/white-papers/global-branding-strategies-white-paper (2012-12-22)
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  • Global Branding Strategy Whitepaper
    Blog Alumni Events Executive Education Workshops Information Sessions Knowledge Leadership Series KLS Past Events Initial Application Form Ambassador Referral Global Branding Strategy Whitepaper Home Complete the form below to download the white paper Global Branding Strategy by Anthony Di Benedetto Ph D Temple University First Name Last Name Company name Position Title Email Address How did you first hear about us Please be specific colleague search engine Financial Times Google

    Original URL path: http://www.temple.sg/global-branding-strategy-whitepaper (2012-12-22)
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  • Global Branding Strategies White Paper
    is easy to see the value in familiar brands such as Coca Cola Toyota Nike or Apple Marketing people refer to brand equity as the added brand value that results from careful investment in brand marketing by the firm and is created over time by the relationship between the brand and customer Brand equity is valuable to the firm as it builds customer loyalty and repurchase and gets greater reseller support thus making future marketing and product launch activities much more cost efficient Branding for the domestic market is challenging enough Names must be chosen that communicate the physical or sensory qualities of the brand that are clear relevant and not irritating or insulting that might be transferable to a line of products in the future and that support the overall new product strategy Few if any brands score high on all these dimensions But when developing a branding strategy for the global market the branding decision becomes even more complicated In addition to all of the above the firm must now consider whether it should standardize the brand name across all markets or use two or more regional brand names And this decision in not made in a vacuum

    Original URL path: http://www.temple.sg/print/executive-education/white-papers/global-branding-strategies-white-paper (2012-12-22)
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  • Send page by e-mail
    Preview Alumni Testimonial EMBA Brochure MSHRM Overview Engage Apply Academics Faculty Calendar Program Objective Admissions Tuition Scholarships MSHRM Class Preview Alumni Testimonial MSHRM Brochure Executive Education White Papers Executive Education Workshops In House Training Next Generation Excel Tip of the Month Our Trainers Blog Alumni Events Executive Education Workshops Information Sessions Knowledge Leadership Series KLS Past Events Initial Application Form Ambassador Referral Send page by e mail Home Your e

    Original URL path: http://www.temple.sg/printmail/112 (2012-12-22)
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  • Tolerating Ambiguity in the Negotiating Process White Paper
    December 1 2011 In his classic work The Nature of Managerial Work the scholar Henry Mintzberg observed that most characteristic of top manager decision making as the unstructured situation 1973 p 191 That is managers have to make decisions in open ended dynamic circumstances faced not only with risk and uncertainty but more importantly with ambiguity Good managers learn how to deal with the ambiguities of predicting the consequences of their strategic choices of having incomplete information of coordinating the activities of many subordinates and in general dealing with many difficult and complex matters Similar ambiguities and paradoxes apply to the negotiator For instance What is my relationship with my counterparts and how important is that relationship to the achievement of my goals Are the people or organizations I am negotiating with my potential partners or my foes If they are my partners now will they become my enemies tomorrow Can I trust them Do I need them more or do they need me more Who has more power in the situation How should I deal with power issues and egos How can I achieve the best results on my major goals Is it better to play hardball or to

    Original URL path: http://www.temple.sg/executive-education/white-papers/tolerating-ambiguity-negotiating-process-white-paper (2012-12-22)
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  • Tolerating Ambiguity in the Negotiating Process Paper
    Events Executive Education Workshops Information Sessions Knowledge Leadership Series KLS Past Events Initial Application Form Ambassador Referral Tolerating Ambiguity in the Negotiating Process Home Complete the form below to download the white paper Tolerating Ambiguity in the Negotiating Process by Arthur Hochner Ph D Temple University First Name Last Name Company name Position Title Email Address How did you first hear about us Please be specific colleague search engine Financial

    Original URL path: http://www.temple.sg/tolerating-ambiguity-negotiating-process (2012-12-22)
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