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  • The killer book of cold cases incredible stories, facts, and trivia from the most baffling true crime cases of all time - Read On
    after the killings Doug Tuley s wife was working in her Manhattan Beach backyard perhaps a mile from the kill site when she found something significant a watch Although the Ford from the crime spree had been abandoned not far way she didn t realize the watch s importance to the murder case Sometime after that Tuley himself found part of a 22 caliber revolver He did not attach any special significance to the gun either although he put it on a shelf instead of throwing it out p p A few years later in 1960 Tuley s son Bob discovered something else in the backyard the gun s rusty cylinder It was then that the father made the connection He knew that his house was only about a mile from the crime scene so he called the El Segundo cops Tuley figured that since the car had been found abandoned nearby the killer probably had broken up the gun and tossed it in the backyard p p b Murder Weapon b p p After running ballistics tests on the gun cops determined that it had fired the bullets that hit the two cops Detectives checked the serial number on the gun and then two of them traveled 1 600 miles to a Sears Roebuck store in Shreveport Louisiana Records showed that the gun had been purchased there three years earlier for around thirty dollars by someone who signed the name G D Wilson in wide spaced handwriting p p Surprisingly the young clerk remembered the man a big guy with a pompadour who spoke in a Southern drawl and seemed anxious to leave the store quickly But that s as far as the cops could go and the case went cold again For each of the next forty two years it got colder until it was ice But of course it had not been forgotten particularly by cops and the families of the slain officers It was a bleeding open wound in their minds p p While the case went nowhere for all of those years forensics had advanced particularly DNA which could be extracted from hair blood and semen In Los Angeles two people had been appointed to try to clear as many cold cases as possible using this new science One person was Lisa Kahn head of the District Attorney s Forensic Science Division and the other was David Lambkin of the Los Angeles Cold Case Division which used DNA and computerized fingerprint and ballistic records to try to identify perpetrators p p But there was no DNA from the double cop killing The rape victim s dress had semen on it but following procedure in those days the cops had returned the dress to the victim after they finished examining it and the dress was long gone p p b The Case Opens Up b p p After a false lead in 2002 awakened interest in the case investigators decided to run the partial fingerprints through the FBI s Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System or IAFIS Federal law enforcement agencies and those from every state send criminal offenders fingerprints to IAFIS forming a national database of more than 40 million prints p p b strong What Is CODIS strong b p p strong The Combined DNA Index System CODIS is an electronic database of DNA profiles administered through the FBI The system lets federal state and local crime labs share and compare DNA profiles Through CODIS investigators match DNA from crime scenes with convicted offenders and with other crime scenes using computer software just as fingerprints are matched through IAFIS strong p p strong CODIS uses two indexes the convicted offender index which contains profiles of convicted offenders and the forensic index which contains profiles from crime scene evidence strong p p strong The real strength of CODIS lies in solving cases that have no suspects If DNA evidence entered into CODIS matches someone in the offender index a warrant can be obtained authorizing the collection of a sample from that offender to confirm the match If the offender s DNA is in the forensic index the system allows investigators even in different jurisdictions to exchange information about their respective cases em From the National Institute of Justice em strong p p Investigators working the 1957 case had the prints cleaned up and reprocessed digitally Then they ran the prints through the database and waited Lt Craig Cleary head of El Segundo s detective unit was speechless when the results came in A crime lab analyst said there was a hit p p Cleary reacted the way many people would react I thought he was kidding But when I asked him if he was sure he said Yes p p Now with a suspect police focused on him like stink on shit as one cop crudely put it They expected to find a hardened criminal but that s not what they encountered The person who matched the prints was a family man and had a successful business Gerald Mason lived in Columbia South Carolina His prints were available because he had been arrested for robbery in 1956 the year before the killings That was the only time he had been charged with a crime But the FBI s IAFIS wasn t established until 1999 and Mason s prints took a long time to make their way into the database p p The cops did not consider the prints enough to make their case They needed more said David Lambkin I wanted to make sure forty six years later that we had a rock solid case before arresting someone who is a successful businessman and a pillar of his community Lambkin wanted a case that definitely would go to trial and end with conviction p p To do this the investigators found every witness they could though a number of the people involved including the sixteen year old driver of the stolen Ford had passed away p

    Original URL path: http://readon.sg/det_14691747.aspx (2013-04-29)
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  • How spending and saving affect you - Read On
    Strazzabosco John Publisher Rosen Pub 2013 ISBN 9781448883448 library binding Find in Library Reader Reviews Table of Contents Table of Contents Introduction p 5 On the National Level p 7 The Role of Banks p 18 When to Spend and When to Save p 29 Factors That Affect Your Financial Decisions p 37 On the State Level p 46 How the Economy Affects You p 58 Glossary p 69 For

    Original URL path: http://readon.sg/det_14625371.aspx (2013-04-29)
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  • How deflation affects you - Read On
    More Information p 68 For Further Reading p 71 Bibliography p 73 Index p 77 Terms of Use Summary Readers discover what deflation is in global and national economies through accessible easy to understand terms They also learn how deflation is measured as well as how rises and falls in the Gross Domestic Product describe expansions and downturns in the economy Japan s lost decade of the 1990s is used

    Original URL path: http://readon.sg/det_14625345.aspx (2013-04-29)
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  • See now then - Read On
    of My Mother brings her singular lyricism and beautifully recursive tendencies to the inner life of Mrs Sweet who is facing the end of her marriage and who over the course of the book considers the distinctions between her nows and her thens particularly when recounting what was while the memories bleed with a pain that still is Particularly touching is Kincaid s rendering of motherhood The immediacy of Mrs Sweet s small son s toys Ninja Turtles and Power Rangers creates a significant foil to the ethereal interior echoes Such is the reality of parenting what is imagined or remembered loses every battle against plastic warriors and the demands of children What s startling is the presumably autobiographical nature of the plot The family lives in Bennington Vt like Kincaid and Mr Sweet is a composer who leaves his wife for a younger musician as was the case with Kincaid s former husband While evidence of fictionalization is obvious naming the children after Greek myths the book feels precariously balanced between meticulous language and raw emotion The distinction between life and art is not always clear but only a writer as deft as Kincaid can blur the lines so elegantly Agent The Wiley Agency Feb c Copyright PWxyz LLC All rights reserved Library Journal c Copyright 2010 Library Journals LLC a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source Inc No redistribution permitted Fans of Lannan Literary Award winner Kincaid s Lucy and Mr Potter have waited more than ten years for this novel about a couple and their two children living in small town New England But Kincaid is less interested in their everyday lives than what goes on in their minds c Copyright 2012 Library Journals LLC a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source Inc No redistribution permitted Library Journal c Copyright 2010 Library Journals LLC a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source Inc No redistribution permitted Lannan Award winner Kincaid Lucy here offers a lyrical reverie on the doomed marriage between Mr and Mrs Sweet a Caribbean born writer and gardener and a New York City composer who are raising their children in Shirley Jackson s former home in a quaint Vermont town It reads like a meditation with strong allusions to Greek mythology and poetic repetitions that recall Homeric refrains The title refers to the author s conceit that everything can be glimpsed in the same instant and the narrative moves vertiginously forward and backward through time sometimes within a single paragraph All of Kincaid s works can be construed as semiautobiographical to some degree but with so many of the details here matching the circumstances of the author s own life and family the portrait can come off as bitter and vengeful There is nothing redeeming about the bloodless intellectual Mr Sweet who harbors murderous rage and boundless contempt toward his devoted wife and sporty distractible son VERDICT The excessive lyricism and lack of linear structure can make this a difficult read but literary fiction collections

    Original URL path: http://readon.sg/det_14707397.aspx (2013-04-29)
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  • The new manufacturing challenge techniques for continuous improvement - Read On
    run Some may say that machines must be watched so that corrective action can be taken quickly whenever a problem arises But is that not already too late for an operator to take action Shouldn t there be a mechanism that automatically stops the machine and buzzes or lights up to alert an operator when an abnormal condition occurs Another way to look at this is that there will be no initiative to eliminate the causes of such problems because these problems are not being exposed clearly to the supervisor s eyes instead they are often resolved by operators without a supervisor s knowledge Even though some supervisors may prefer to ignore such problems as long as production schedules are met should such practices be allowed Transportation waste Transportation waste and double or triple handling are also commonly observed wastes in most factories For example incoming material may be stored in the warehouse before it is brought to the line With such a practice a tracking person has to be informed where to pick up the material where to store it in the warehouse where and when to pick it up again and where to deliver the material down the line He may even have to bring materials left over from the line back to the storage area if there is a lack of coordination Ill planned layouts may make long distance transportation necessary They can also result in double or triple handling of parts that have been put away in a disorderly manner and then kept in temporary storage and switching storage locations Often we are amazed to discover how many miles a product must travel through the factory before it is completed In order to eliminate this waste improvement in layout coordination of processes methods of transportation housekeeping and workplace organization need to be considered Processing waste The processing method itself may be a source of problems resulting in unnecessary waste For example a certain die casting operation may require additional labor to file and finish the surface But a finishing operator may be quite unnecessary if the die is maintained well or if manufacturability had been considered in the product design Also in manufacture of the products certain aspects of the painting sealing or bolt tightening processes may be unnecessary in meeting product requirements When fixtures are not well maintained or prepared operators may have to use extra effort in processing the materials Certain defects may be produced by these inappropriate processing procedures An example of improvement in a drilling operation to eliminate waste in processing is represented in Exhibit 1 6 Certain fixtures may be added or modified to facilitate operation of a machine For example the use of an air cylinder or chain and sprocket may help to automate the machine drilling operation Similarly the power of the drill machine motor may be used to eject the finished product automatically Also the combination of a gravityfed chute and fixture may make automatic loading possible thereby totally eliminating operator involvement Inventory waste As discussed above in connection with waste of overproduction excess inventory increases the cost of a product It requires extra handling extra space extra interest charges extra people extra paperwork and so on Because of the problems associated with unnecessary inventory we should consciously try to reduce inventory levels Dispose of obsolete materials housekeeping workplace organization Do not produce items not required by the subsequent process line balance Do not purchase or bring in items in large lot sizes savings achieved through volume discounts may be more than offset by inventory waste Manufacture products in small lots reduced setup time more changeovers As we begin to reduce inventory levels we may find more problems that need to be addressed before the inventory level can be reduced further This is comparable to reducing the water level to expose the rocks as shown in Exhibit 1 8 Because of the many problems associated with inventory we need to pay more attention to clearing out the waste associated with inventory To emphasize this point let s just say that excess inventory is the root of all evil Waste of motion Whatever time is not spent in adding value to the product should be eliminated as much as possible One fact we should constantly bear in mind is that move does not necessarily equal work An operator may keep busy for three hours looking for tools all around the factory without adding even a penny of worth to the product Instead he has increased the cost of the product by three hours of his wages together with three hours of production lead time before delivery of the product to the customer We can find many other examples of this kind of waste Pick and place is another example of movement that can be reduced by keeping parts or tools closer to where they are used or even eliminated by using chutes and other fixtures Walking is another kind of wasteful movement especially when one person is responsible for operating several machines Machines should be placed so that the operator s walking time is minimized Waste from product defects When defects occur at one station operators at subsequent stations waste time waiting thereby adding cost to the product and adding to production lead time Furthermore rework may be required or the defective products are scrapped If a defect has occurred in the assembly operation additional labor is required to disassemble the product and additional parts are required for reassembly Obviously schedules must be adjusted to accommodate these changes Sorting out bad parts from good parts also requires additional labor There is a waste of both the materials and the value of work already added to the parts An even worse case exists when customers find defects after product delivery Not only are warranty costs and additional delivery costs incurred but future business with the customer as well as market share may be lost To eliminate these problems a system

    Original URL path: http://readon.sg/det_14688139.aspx (2013-04-29)
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  • Blindspot hidden biases of good people - Read On
    internalized stereotypes Perhaps the most interesting aspect of these results is the degree to which these mindbugs then become self fulfilling prophecies to the point where people are willing to sacrifice their self interest for the sake of maintaining the existing social order What arises as critical is that these behaviors often occur in ways that are subtle and unintentional having more to do with a favoritism of one s own in group rather than actual animosity toward others Banaji and Greenwald will keep even nonpsychology students engaged with plenty of self examinations and compelling elucidations of case studies and experiments Agent Katinka Matson and John Brockman Brockman Inc Feb 5 c Copyright PWxyz LLC All rights reserved Terms of Use Table of Contents Preface p xi Mindbugs p 3 Shades of Truth p 21 Into the Blindspot p 32 Not That There s Anything Wrong with That p 53 Homo Categoricus p 71 The Hidden Costs of Stereotypes p 94 Us and Them p 123 Outsmarting the Machine p 145 Are Americans Racist p 169 Race Disadvantage and Discrimination p 189 Acknowledgments p 211 Notes p 217 References p 233 Index p 245 Terms of Use Summary I know my own mind I am able to assess others in a fair and accurate way These self perceptions are challenged by leading psychologists Mahzarin R Banaji and Anthony G Greenwald as they explore the hidden biases we all carry from a lifetime of exposure to cultural attitudes about age gender race ethnicity religion social class sexuality disability status and nationality Blindspot is the authors metaphor for the portion of the mind that houses hidden biases Writing with simplicity and verve Banaji and Greenwald question the extent to which our perceptions of social groups without our awareness or conscious control shape

    Original URL path: http://readon.sg/det_14688287.aspx (2013-04-29)
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  • From 0 to financial freedom how to do it today! - Read On
    security Perhaps supporting the needy or disadvantaged Well if you believe and follow the conventional approach to investing then forget it It s unlikely you ll ever be financially free because the way most people approach investing results in seven out of ten retirees ending up needing the age pension a mere 25 of average weekly earnings to survive You need a different approach and in this book expert property

    Original URL path: http://readon.sg/det_14711301.aspx (2013-04-29)
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  • Contemporary Morocco : state, politics and society under Mohammed VI / edited by Bruce Maddy-Weitzman and Daniel Zisenwine. - Read On
    Society and Informal Politics The Emergence of the New Press and the Delimitation of Free Speech in Morocco under Mohammed VI The Amazigh Factor State Movement Relations under Mohammed VI The Emerging Power of Civil Society The Human Rights Discourse Feminism Islamism and a Third Way Feet on the Earth Head in the Clouds What do Moroccan Youths Dream of Youth Political Activism and the Festivalization of Hip Hop Music in Morocco Terms of Use Summary Discussions of the unsettled political and social landscapes in the Middle East and North Africa frequently point to Morocco as an exception An Arab League member state Morocco enjoys a favorable image in the West seemingly combining a healthy and balanced mix of tradition and modernity authenticity with openness to foreign cultures political stability and evolution towards greater pluralism and a marked improvement in the legal and social status of women This book offers a comprehensive and detailed scholarly examination of Morocco s political social and cultural evolution under King Mohammed VI Contributions from an international lineup of experts on Moroccan history politics economy society and culture explain the tension and dynamics between the state authorities and competing social actors and highlight the durability

    Original URL path: http://readon.sg/det_14715541.aspx (2013-04-29)
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