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  • Training Course Schedule « Preservation Of Monuments Board
    in participating in VGP 2012 DATE CLASS TYPE ITEM Week 1 Lecture Introductory Lecture Series 1 Facilitator Course Introduction Visit to NAS NLB facilities Week 2 Lecture Introductory Lecture Series 2 Summation Group discussion Week 3 Work Week Non meeting work week Week 4 Face to Face Presentation of preliminary findings for Mentor Tours Admin briefing for Exploratory Tours Week 5 Face to Face Exploratory Facilitator Tour 1 Week 6 Face to Face Exploratory Facilitator Tour 2 Week 7 Face to Face Feedback on Exploratory Tours Formalization of Mentor Tours Finalisation of Tour Script Outline Week 8 Work Week Non meeting work week Week 9 On Job Training On the Job Training at a National Monument TBC Week 10 Work Week Non meeting work week Week 11 On Job Training On the Job Training at a National Monument TBC Week 12 Face to Face Final Tour conducted by Group A Week 13 Face to Face Final Tours conducted by Group B Deadline for Script Submission for Group A Week 14 Marking Week Deadline for Script Submission for Group B Week 15 Summation Summation exchange Briefing on June School Holidays Tours Course Summation Luncheon NOTE Depending on cohort mandatory tailing of

    Original URL path: http://www.pmb.sg/?page_id=926 (2012-12-22)
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  • Enrolling in the Volunteer Guide Programme « Preservation Of Monuments Board
    in January of the enrolment year Members of the public are first invited to learn more about the programme at an information briefing During the enrolment period applications to join the programme will be open Applicants are shortlisted to sit for an interview before the final selection is done Please note that as training slots are limited and filled on a first come first served basis interested parties are encouraged

    Original URL path: http://www.pmb.sg/?page_id=935 (2012-12-22)
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  • The Future Memory Pavilion: An Exciting Live Educational Trail! « Preservation Of Monuments Board
    Another element of Neo Classical architecture Arches and Corinthian columns with rich leaf and foliage detailing The original facade of the National Museum was preserved to retain the unique style and character of the building After exploring the building many explorers were surprised and amazed that the building looks new despite being 124 years old This provided them the opportunity to understand the approach to redeveloping a preserved monument How as a monument the Museum s structural integrity and key architectural features are retained despite undergoing several stages of renovation over the years to meet present day needs After getting a glimpse of architecture through an exploration of the National Museum the explorers took on the Pavilion engaging it with their sense of sight and touch The Pavilion the form of the two cones is extraordinary Like two sides of the same coin it is monumental because of the shape and size standing at 8 metres high yet light because it is framed by robes The architects sought to push the boundaries of architecture by constructing the walls of the Pavilion using black mooring ropes placed at different intervals for each cone This results in the wall of the Pavilion being permeable encouraging passers by to enter the Pavilion from any point through the ropes instead of through a door or entrance Section C The Future Memory Pavilion Where the Past and Present Converge Groups huddled around the cones to listen to the facilitators explanation and interact with the materials within the Pavilion Language literary expressions were another learning outcome of the trail The explorers learnt the expression sands of time by witnessing the trickling of sand from the funnel at the top of the cone to the sand dune at the bottom and its origins in the trickling of sand in an hour glass an instrument used to tell time in the past The lack of barrier between the explorers and the sand cone encouraged them to touch the sand while they pondered and shared their experience of sand in their daily lives The explorers could not believe that the ice blocks on display were real They went up close to the ice blocks and felt the icy cold sensations they touched with their bare hands while a few adventurous ones sat on the ice blocks As they observed the properties of ice through the senses of touch and sight the facilitators asked them to recollect if they had ever met someone with an icy personality With their senses further awakened the explorers ventured into the Singapore History Gallery and Food Gallery to discover the role of sand and ice in Singapore s past Section D Visit to the Singapore History Gallery and Food Gallery Understanding the Role of Sand and Ice in Singapore s Past Explorers listened attentively to the story of how sand and ice first found its way to Singapore in the mid 18 th century Ice resulted in a change in lifestyle for Singaporeans and

    Original URL path: http://www.pmb.sg/?p=2265 (2012-12-22)
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  • Operation MONUMENT! « Preservation Of Monuments Board
    strong reasons for why they would argue for the preservation of the buildings Postcards from the 1970s This postcard brought back memories of some of the buildings that existed in my lifetime but have been torn down to make way for newer developments as our country expands and changes with the times I remember fondly of the weekends when my parents would bring me to the former National Library and I would always look forward to walking up the flight of steps and heading in to find my favourite novel Hazel Chee Asst Manager PMB Image courtesy of the National Museum of Singapore After the introductory session on the Power of Place the teachers proceeded with the action a hands on session in the Singapore History Gallery for some groups and for others a guided monument trail Before the teachers began they were tasked to contend with a quote and support their argument using pieces of evidence gathered from the History Gallery session and the monument trail This quote was taken from a speech given by former Prime Minister Lee at a dinner hosted by the United Kingdom Manufacturers Association and the Confederation of British Industries on 7 February 1967 Educators found the quote useful in guiding their learning experience and as a line of inquiry on their trips Many felt that the value of self directed learning was demonstrated through this mode of learning Segment B Monument Trail Active and Place based Learning at the Monuments Starting from NMS PMB educator Foo Min Li led the group to two other museums Singapore Art Museum former St Joseph s Institution and the Peranakan Museum former Tao Nan School which served as educational institutions in the past Educators reminisced the Bras Basah area which has evolved and changed over time Only monuments such as the former St Joseph s Institution presently the Singapore Art Museum in the background remain These monuments are now landmarks of memory which help to remind people of the original landscape in spite of constant change This was evident through the vibrant exchange between the older and younger teachers The older teachers recollection of the former surroundings notably the dhobis laundry that was laid out on the field where the Singapore Management University stands today shocked some of the younger teachers who had only known the area to be populated with schools Teachers from Nanyang Girls High School and Dunman High School were intrigued as Min Li showed how much the landscape has changed with an old photo of the area Some teachers shared how they have passed these monuments countless time but never noticed the details and intricacies of the building The trail helped to open their eyes to the building In the case of the Former St Joseph s Institution the teachers were able to appreciate the school s architectural features and discover the original 19 th century façade of the school which is partially hidden by newer developments Experiential Learning in the Museum using

    Original URL path: http://www.pmb.sg/?p=2160 (2012-12-22)
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  • An Evening at Kampong Gelam « Preservation Of Monuments Board
    reads from his home There is also a small cemetery outside the mausoleum where Hajjah Fatimah s family is buried Upon exiting the mosque Fabian pointed out to us this mysterious motif on the exterior of the mosque The reasons and symbolisms behind the design of this motif still remain unknown today Fabian claims that there are speculations that this motif is made to present the Gelam leaf To me it looks like a spade On route to the Sultan Mosque Fabian brought us to the road Sultan Gate which led to the entrance to the Istana Kampong Glam the palace built for the Sultan of Singapore Interestingly there used to be a pair of Banyan trees which marked the gate of the palace and one of them still stands today It was difficult to spot both the gate and the tree at first until Fabian pointed to us the tree which has grown over the old structures of the original Sultan Gate over time Next to the Sultan Gate is the Rumah Bendahara also known as the Chief Minister s House Today it serves as a restaurant and is part of the Malay Heritage Centre A pair of stone pigeons used to flag the entrance of the Rumah Bendahara but they have been replaced be stone eagles for reasons unknown You may have seen similar eagles in my previous post about Former Tao Nan School All around the Sultan Mosque small red tents have been set up selling all types of kuehs and variations of Middle Eastern cuisine The setting up of this bazaar in the areas surrounding Kampong Gelam during Ramadan has been a tradition since the end of the Japanese Occupation Just outside the mosque Fabian gave us some background history about the monument The Sultan Mosque was built as part of the agreement Sir Stamford Raffles made with the Sultan In this agreement Raffles promised that the East India Company would contribute 3000 to the construction of the mosque It was built in 1924 for 250 thousand dollars The original Sultan Mosque was a single storey brick building built in a Javanese architectural style It was demolished and rebuilt to accommodate the growing numbers of worshippers Swan and Maclaren undertook the design of the mosque designed in the Indro Saracenic style an architectural style that has roots in nomadic Arab tribes of the Syrian Arab desert One distinctive feature of the Mosque is its domes and many people are under the impression that the Mosque only has one onion shaped dome when it actually has two At the base of the dome green bottle ends were donated by the poor as an effort to contribute to the construction of the mosque Tall minarets flank the mosque Loudspeakers were installed in 1936 on two of the four minarets so that the cries of the muezzin official of the mosque who calls for prayers five times daily could reach out to more people The Sultan mosque is truly

    Original URL path: http://www.pmb.sg/?p=2016 (2012-12-22)
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  • Coleman’s Classics « Preservation Of Monuments Board
    conflict It was the first country in the world to make Christianity a state religion in AD 303 As you can tell from the name of the church St Gregory is its patron saint He is known as the Illuminator among the Armenian community as he was said to have brought Christianity to Armenia in the 4 th Century Daphne explained that the Armenians were among the earliest settlers in Singapore They were a small but wealthy community and set up a church here in Singapore for communal activities In July 1827 the Armenian community petitioned for a priest to be sent to Singapore and their wishes were granted when the Archbishop of Persia sent Reverend Gregory Johannes Prior to this I have never really heard much about Armenians before and was quite curious as to who they were I certainly found this tour extremely enlightening in regards to the Armenian community not only in Singapore but in the world as well The architectural design of this church is very similar to that of the Former Parliament House This church possesses several features distinctive of traditional Armenian churches These include the vaulted ceiling and cupola a domed roof and bell turret Archival photographs of the church reveal that the bell turret used to sit in the middle of the building before it was replaced by a square tower and subsequently the octagonal tower which sits at the front of the building today This replacement was due to safety reasons and the domed roof cupola was replaced with a pitched roof in 1853 after the removal of the bell turret In this picture Daphne conducted her tour in front of the marble altar in the church Although it cannot be seen here the altar actually has a painting of the Last Supper Upon entering the Armenian Church I felt welcomed and at peace The little details found in the church are simple yet beautiful The Armenian Church may not have elaborately designed stained glasses or realistic sculptures as seen in other churches but the simplicity of the church design speaks of humility and faith Statues like these can be seen around the church compound and some of them depict the crucifixion of Jesus Christ This is the parsonage a separate building located in the compound It was meant to be the residence of the priest of the church and this two storey bungalow is typical of the houses built then It has a high ceiling and timber louvered windows Daphne explained that since the passing of the previous priest there has not been a replacement This parsonage is now run by volunteers as is the church and acts as an administrative office A picture of the tour group stopping to take a look at the facade of the church while Daphne explains in greater detail The compound of the Armenian Church is one that echoes serenity and peace It features spacious plots of green grass that are a feast for the

    Original URL path: http://www.pmb.sg/?p=1915 (2012-12-22)
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  • March To Merdeka « Preservation Of Monuments Board
    commemorate the war dead At the Lim Bo Seng Memorial Eugene and Pei Cun re enacted a part of Lim Bo Seng s life for us by acting out a dramatic scene for us The two actors were fantastic and maintained a serious attitude throughout showing respect for Lim Bo Seng I thought that it was very apt of them to do this on his memorial site Lim Bo Seng is a famous war hero in Singapore s history the Japanese Occupation He gave his life for the country in a Sino British effort Force 136 This memorial has bronze plaques in four languages English Chinese Jawi and Tamil Eugene also showed us a secret door in the body of the monument Inside electrical points were installed so that the monument could be lit up like a lantern After taking a short walk on Queen Elizabeth Walk the boys brought us to the Indian National Army monument Although it is not a national monument it was still relevant to the theme as it represented the Indian National Army s collaboration with the Japanese to work against the British during the Japanese Occupation The original structure was destroyed upon the British s return to Singapore after the Japanese Occupation The last memorial we visited was the Cenotaph which is part of the Esplanade memorials and built in memory of the British soldiers who fought in the First World War and the soldiers who perished during the Second World War It was completed in 1922 and unveiled officially by Prince Edward of Wales who later went on to be King Edward VIII There are some notable indentations on the facade of the memorial and they are a result of gunfire during the Second World War This new experience I had with the Esplanade Park memorials was very different from my previous experience from PMB s My Monumental Playground event My Monumental Playground was almost a celebratory affair bringing families and children together in appreciation of the efforts of those who gave their lives for Singapore s independence March to Merdeka on the other hand allowed us to go deeper into the meaning and history behind the memorials fostering a greater understanding on the type of challenges our country faced before its independence Moving on from the trials and turbulences in Singapore s history we moved to our next monument the Former Supreme Court and City Hall markers of Singapore s eventual move towards self governance and eventually independence On the very steps of City Hall the Japanese surrendered to the Allied forces in 1945 and Singapore s self government status was declared These two events were extremely significant in the making of modern Singapore The four boys concluded the tour with some powerful imagery They spoke of how magnificent it must be for the F1 Grand Prix racers to go by these beautiful and majestic monuments They highlighted how these monuments are highly symbolic to Singapore just like Westminster Palace in England

    Original URL path: http://www.pmb.sg/?p=1846 (2012-12-22)
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  • Events « Preservation Of Monuments Board
    inspire ideas and thoughts about our city and what it might look like in the future through the use of two materials sand and ice while exploring Singapore s past and the connection between its past and future The Preservation of Monuments Board PMB designed an educational guide and trail for students and families to embark on an exciting journey to the Pavilion and the National Museum s galleries to learn about the significance of these two materials in Singapore s history 540 students had the opportunity to attend a 2 hour explorer s journey led by PMB facilitators Throughout the journey these young minds were actively engaged as they were encouraged to ponder about preservation and its implications for future memory against the backdrop of one of Singapore s most significant national monuments which opened in 1887 the National Museum of Singapore Students used this educational guide that was specially developed and designed by PMB for this learning journey Families and members of the public can pick up a complimentary copy of the educational guide and embark on a self exploratory experience So come by before the Pavilion comes down after 19 November as it is an experience not to be missed Read the rest of this entry for photographs to give you an idea of what you can learn when you embark on a self guided Future Memory Pavilion trail The Future Memory Pavilion Wed 19 Oct Sat 19 Nov 2011 Stamford Green National Museum of Singapore 10am 8pm Click here to read more about The Future Memory Pavilion An Exciting Live Educational Trail more Posted in Events Tours No Comments The Last Days of Tanjong Pagar Railway Station Saturday July 2nd 2011 Post by Loh Pei Ying Undergraduate at the National University of Singapore NUS History On

    Original URL path: http://www.pmb.sg/?cat=5 (2012-12-22)
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