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  • Human Capital Singapore
    at least 25 employees This was based on a survey on the Retirement and Re employment Practices in Singapore in the fourth quarter of 2011 Mr Tharman said nearly two thirds of these workers had carried on working on their existing employment terms while about 30 per cent were re employed under a new contract Of this latter group 96 per cent or almost all had no change in their job scope For all employees who continued working in the same job beyond 62 95 per cent or almost all were paid at least the same wages The same survey also found that about one in 10 private establishments which allowed re employment in the same job or allowed their employees to carry on working on their existing terms had a policy of making adjustments to the employment benefits of their employees such as the provision of annual leave and medical benefits Mr Tharman said The high proportion of workers who continued to be employed beyond the age of 62 last year in the same job and paid at least the same wages is likely to be the result of the tight labour market conditions and the success of tripartite efforts to promote re employment With the Retirement and Re employment Act coming into effect in January this year employers are now legally obliged to offer re employment to all local employees who have satisfactory performance and are medically fit Measure Organisational Climate Analyse and Present Research Information Implement Strategies to Employ Retain and Re Employ Older Employees Lead Organisational Design Manage Projects Issue 008 HCS Bytes Lessons hard pressed employers should not ignore 17 12 2012 The SMRT mainland Chinese drivers strike has placed in the spotlight several issues that many hard pressed businesses might not have paid heed

    Original URL path: http://hcs.com.sg/v2/index.php/info/view_news/nine-out-of-10-singaporeans-over-the-age-of-62-remain-employed (2012-12-22)
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  • Human Capital Singapore
    market Even with unemployment sitting at it s lowest point in 17 years employees in Singapore are cautious as companies look to undertake cost cutting in order to achieve financial performance targets To alleviate these concerns business leaders should incorporate a strong message about financial stability and corporate strength into their employer branding That is the messaging that will position an organisation as an employer of choice and fosters brand loyalty This will help to attract and secure talent in Singapore s skills short marketplace and give employees a sense of greater security said Ms Loveridge The survey found differences in opinions between male and female respondents Among the most important factors for men were strong companies that offer global career opportunities good training and strong management On the other hand workplace location flexible working arrangements and a pleasant workplace atmosphere were most important for women Interesting job content was equally valued by male and female respondents and women are looking for competitive salary benefits more than their male counterparts The survey also showed that long term job security flexible working arrangements and companies that promote diversity in the workplace are a greater focus among mature workers while younger respondents look for global career opportunities good work life balance and training Ms Loveridge concludes It s important for organisations to understand what people value and what motivates their career choices Companies that successfully define their employer brand to engage jobseekers will attract and retain the best talent and create a vital competitive edge in today s marketplace Source Randstad See http m randstad com sg about randstad mobile news details id 4181 Develop Strategies for Manpower Planning and Resourcing Develop Strategies and Policies for Employee Relations Recruit and Select Staff for International Assignments Administer Recruitment and Selection Process Promote Harmonious

    Original URL path: http://hcs.com.sg/v2/index.php/info/view_news/employees-rank-financial-health-of-a-business-first (2012-12-22)
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  • Human Capital Singapore
    they worry that they may grow old before they grow rich The moral is every country has its own problems many of these problems are similar to ours It is inevitable because of globalization because of technological progress affecting all of the world We are certainly not perfect but I think we should see our progress and our problems in perspective On balance I think we are in good shape to tackle the problems but we must get our strategies right The first strategy we must have is to keep Singapore open and embrace the world We must be open in our mindsets an outward looking confident society willing to change welcoming competition willing to consider new ideas and to explore new opportunities That is how we have become a successful and cosmopolitan city That is how we have competed against bigger countries and held our own That is how we can stay abreast of the changes improve our lives and secure a bright future for our children here in Singapore So when it comes to trade we are prepared to do business with anybody Trans Pacific Partnership with America Australia and so on we have joined in FTA with EU despite all their problems we still want to do business with them Let us see how we can get a win win relationship going We open ourselves to the world to business We also welcome talent an attitude which has served us well I described just now in my Chinese speech how the Hong Kong TV channel TVB talked about our policies here and admired us for it But I give you a more personal example of this Many people come to Singapore to live work or play They are impressed by Singapore they go back home they may rise they are promoting Singapore as a friend as a place where there is opportunity to prosper together One such person is New Zealand Prime Minister Mr John Key He recently visited us Many of you do not know he actually lived and worked in Singapore about 15 years ago in the mid 1990s for Merrill Lynch His son was born here and he remembers Singapore fondly especially East Coast Park and the chilli crabs and the pepper crabs which he still eats every time he is here privately Now he is Prime Minister of New Zealand pursuing more cooperation with Singapore which will benefit us whether it is in terms of us getting food from New Zealand opening new education opportunities in New Zealand or travel opportunities there So an open attitude I think serves us well We need not just focus on small numbers of top talent but a wide range of foreign professionals and skilled workers This remains a hot issue for Singaporeans because they worry about overcrowding about competition for themselves and their children about different social norms language and so on Yesterday I posted an article on my Facebook page It was about Germany facing this problem of foreign talent They do not have enough workers their economy is prospering they need engineers they need IT people They are importing some of them from southern Europe where there are no jobs In the long term this is going to be a great help to Germany because it is going to strengthen their industries strengthen their capabilities build them up as an economic power even more But in the long term it is going to weaken the countries which lose these talents and the Spanish are worried one day they may end up doing nothing except tourism and agriculture But the Germans also face problems because the foreigners come in different language different culture they cannot fit in with the Germans The Germans say Herr to one another Mr so and so very formal in their engagements The southern Europeans are very informal in their engagements So there is that clash and it grates I posted this to trigger some thought among Singaporeans perhaps to realise that hey we are not alone in our problems It attracted hundreds of comments many heartfelt and thoughtful ones from readers People clearly seized with the issue trying to see how we are different from Germany what problems we are facing in Singapore This is a strategic issue for Singapore and important for us to get right We will be debating immigration and foreign worker issues later this year So I cannot solve the problem today But today I would just like to focus on one angle concerning foreign workers and that is the economic angle The way the employers look at this is different from the way the workers look at this The employers as Swee Say told you just now feel that they cannot find enough workers in Singapore especially workers who will stay on the job Hence better to bring in some foreign workers seize the opportunities rather than let the business go somewhere else At least you keep the jobs the business in Singapore and you keep some jobs in Singapore The workers often see it differently that the foreign workers add to competition against them If there are too many it may reduce wages and it may even take away some of the jobs which Singaporeans can do Better we have fewer foreign workers and let our wages rise If you ask me which to believe I would say both arguments have their merits but each one is only valid up to a point You need a mix of local and foreign workers to man the companies But if you set up a new company and only create jobs for foreigners then you must ask whether it is really good for the company to come and invest in Singapore What is the point On the other hand if you want the company to come and you insist that all the jobs are reserved for locals and you do not give them any foreigners and you do not have enough Singaporean workers or the right type then I think the jobs will disappear The IRs came to Singapore We have created 30 000 to 40 000 jobs in the two IRs many of them for Singaporeans but not all for Singaporeans If we had required the IRs to hire only Singaporeans I do not think we would have got the IRs and I do not think Singaporeans would have got the jobs which have pushed up demand for hotel workers which have enabled hotel wages to go up significantly for many other hotels and F B outlets and which have put the pressure on the hotels to upgrade just like Matthew Emmanuel from the example Secretary General Lim cited earlier just now The reality is we need a mix companies need a mix and we must strike the right balance When I met the union leaders last week they all told me without exception that they could not find enough workers Every sector whether it is manufacturing whether it is electronics whether F B whether services all are looking for people We are creating more opportunities than we have bodies to fill Last year we created 120 000 jobs but there were only 32 000 Singaporeans who joined the labour force to fill them one in four Our unemployment is already so low and many of the rank and file workers are already working overtime to meet demand We have had to top up with foreign workers to lower costs and to enable us to seize that opportunity when the business is good Then the new companies can start then we can start creating new jobs better jobs for Singaporeans Then we can give the company a chance to build a Singapore core One of the unionists asked me how many foreign workers do we need I said there is no magic number It depends on the opportunities In a good year we want to allow a few more to come in In a slow year we can tighten we can let some of them go off But it also depends on our own needs If we want to build more HDB flats and MRT lines you need more foreign workers You want to have more hospitals and nursing homes I think it is unavoidable You need some extra nurses some extra allied health professionals even some extra doctors from wherever you can find them who can serve us well But in total we have to slow the inflow of foreign workers significantly in the coming years because we just cannot keep on bringing in 80 000 more foreign workers a year There is just not enough space and it is not sustainable The number of foreign workers will keep on going up and up and up So we have tightened up slowed down not squeezed and reduced but just slowed down the increase and I think the companies are already feeling the squeeze This will give them the incentive to upgrade their productivity and also to develop a Singaporean core in their companies people who will form the long term skills long term loyalty long term capability for the companies and for Singapore While we must always be open to the world let me be quite clear Singaporeans will always be our priority This is the purpose of all our policies including on foreign workers or talent We are trying to seek the maximum advantage for Singapore and for Singaporeans The second major strategy we need is to grow our economy sustainably and share the fruits of growth with all Singaporeans Economic growth is still very important to us not just for its own sake but to provide jobs for each one of you to support your families to bring up your children None of the stories which Swee Say told you just now would have happened without growth Growth is a result of each one of those stories adding together into one big collective story the story of Singapore Growth gives us opportunities for Singaporeans to pursue their aspirations and resources to improve our lives and help those in need Growth is going to slow down because of our constraints not enough land not enough labour This is unavoidable But we actually need to work twice as smart to get growth through higher productivity because if you do not have space and you do not have productivity growth you are going to have very little results very little prosperity We will lose vibrancy and drive and it will be disastrous for Singapore To get that it means we have to restructure restructure our industries grow new industries add new value and phase out the industries which are no longer viable and accept this turnover Even when we are prospering every quarter a few thousand workers will be retrenched but many more jobs will be created Take the electronics industry we have been in electronics for a long time but the type of electronics has changed over the years We used to assemble basic electronic products TV sets VCRs PCs Referring to picture on screen These are CRT tubes which you would not see in the shops any more But the older ones here can explain to the younger ones what these things are We used to make these low end electronics Over 20 years 1990 2011 we restructured to focus on semi conductors the brains of the chips inside the machines So now we produce high end electronics When you have a biometric passport the chip inside the passport 80 per cent of those chips used around the world are made in Singapore in factories like this It s a big transformation over two decades lost 37 000 jobs but we created nearly 30 000 new jobs higher skilled better pay Productivity increased five times Contribution to GDP increased more than three times for the whole industry Workers wages also went up How does this happen on the ground It means we have to work company by company worker by worker The way Swee Say described just now one story by one story The companies have to take the lead to make productivity and skills upgrading a priority work with the unions and workers and share the gains with the workers because that s the right thing to do it is the best thing to do The workers have to do their part too to partner the companies to upgrade to learn new skills to contribute their ideas and improve performance because as one of the unionists told me the workers know the processes They know where something is not efficient and is wasteful they know they can save on some procedures and save time and save effort and do it better If you can engage the workers and make them enthused about it it will make a big difference So as Brother Lim Kuang Beng from SISEU told me productivity improvements must be bottom up as well as top down and that what we need workers to do We also hope companies and workers will take full advantage of what the government is doing to support productivity improvements For instance our restructuring grants for SMEs and our CET efforts Continuing Education and Training We are building very beautiful new campuses for CET Referring to picture of CET Campus East on screen This one is a CET campus East at Paya Lebar Central We are also building one in the West at Jurong Lake District Trainees do not go to these CET Campuses for holidays They go for hard work and upgrading We have got the National Productivity and Continuing Education Council the NPCEC developing productivity road maps for different sectors Road maps to specifically do things better in that industry For example for the food services sector recommending that companies share part time workers during peak periods or using mobile ordering systems such as a PDA so you do not have to shout the orders to the kitchen and scribble them down Precision engineering also has road maps with study awards with master craftsmen to be trained So we have got specific ways we can improve productivity CBD Can Be Done I give you one more example to add to Swee Say s many examples Take Showa Denko it is a hard disk drive manufacturing company UWEEI knows the company well Last year they merged two plants together to improve productivity and the quality of their products They upgraded their workers redeployed their workers expanded their job scope so maintenance people covered more machines the production personnel improved their trouble shooting skills etc And so Showa Denko s operating costs came down ten per cent and their workers got higher salaries and bigger bonuses So that is the way we do it step by step The third thing we must do is to translate growth to higher wages and better lives Our ultimate aim is to improve lives for all of us especially average Singaporeans and especially the lower income Over the last five years in fact incomes have gone up Median incomes have gone up by 13 per cent after inflation since 2006 Our goal is to keep real wages going up year by year So we are tightening on foreign workers and I think this will help to push the wages up But to sustain these higher wages beyond the first push not just for two or three years but for ten years and longer then we need to raise productivity we need to upgrade skills We have talked about 30 per cent real wage growth in a decade That is a very ambitious target Let me try and explain to you what 30 per cent real wage growth means To get that you must get the same productivity growth at least Right So you must get at least 30 per cent productivity growth in ten years because then the employer will share some the workers will share some And if you look at it year by year and break it down that means every year I need to make 2 7 per cent productivity growth 2 7 per cent year by year 10 years compounded I can make 30 per cent in a decade and then we can raise the workers wages by 30 per cent 2 7 per cent doesn t look a very big number but it is a very challenging target 2Since 2000 the last 12 years what have we done 1 7 per cent per year 2 7 per cent is almost one third better If you compare with developed countries let us see what they have done Most of them have done 1 to 2 per cent US the best UK less Japan just 1 per cent So when we say we want to make 30 per cent productivity increase 30 per cent wage growth in 10 years we are talking about stretch targets for Singapore Not easy to do but I think we should set an ambitious goal and try our best to achieve it to the best of our ability and make sure that we make progress over the next ten years We must make a special effort for the low wage workers because they are the ones most affected by competition by inflation struggling to compete and facing a predicament which many low wage workers face all over the world Unfortunately there is no easy solution for this Professor Lim Chong Yah recently proposed pushing up low wage worker wages quickly 50 per cent in three years I appreciate his good intentions I share his concerns over this group of workers But I do not agree with his drastic approach because the only realistic way to lift their wages is step by step with wages and productivity going up in tandem together as fast as we can but as fast as it

    Original URL path: http://hcs.com.sg/v2/index.php/info/view_news/what-pm-lee-hsien-loong-said-in-his-1-may-message (2012-12-22)
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  • Human Capital Singapore
    on the training according to Ms Arinya Thalerngsri managing director of the APM Group a people development consulting firm The company found that leading companies around the world restructure their training programmes to contain fewer workshops They are replaced by more action learning to see how the training has been applied in the real work environment where supervisors can monitor the progress of trainees With the change in the learning approach Asian corporations have to re engineer their learning and development departments by establishing their own knowledge rather than adopting it from western countries Besides training and development Asian and local corporations are looking for future organisation models that will drive them to sustainable growth in the dynamic environment Implement Employee Health and Well being in the Workplace Promote Innovation Promote Harmonious Tripartite Relations Measure Human Resource Functional Effectiveness Develop Strategies for Talent Management Issue 008 HCS Bytes Lessons hard pressed employers should not ignore 17 12 2012 The SMRT mainland Chinese drivers strike has placed in the spotlight several issues that many hard pressed businesses might not have paid heed to in the tight labour environment in Singapore in which they are doing all they can just to recruit

    Original URL path: http://hcs.com.sg/v2/index.php/info/view_news/on-the-job-training-now-replacing-workshops (2012-12-22)
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  • Human Capital Singapore
    skilled labour and freer flow of capital Areas of cooperation include human resources development and capacity building recognition of professional qualifications and closer consultation on macroeconomic and financial policies etc APM Group a Thai human resources and organisation development consultancy tells the Bangkok Post newspaper that companies cannot afford to sit idle and wait for job applications to pour in They should rigorously build their employment strategies Given the decline in the relative number of young people in society young talent will be in short supply and naturally they will decide where and how they want to work says Mr Richard Gilman practice leader of the APM Group Assessment Centre If you don t have your strategies in place now your organisation may be facing a talent and staffing crisis that will threaten strategy and even business continuity he said Operate Human Resource Information System Manage Budgets and Finances Analyse and Present Research Information Develop Human Resource Policy Framework Develop Strategies for Talent Management Issue 008 HCS Bytes Lessons hard pressed employers should not ignore 17 12 2012 The SMRT mainland Chinese drivers strike has placed in the spotlight several issues that many hard pressed businesses might not have paid

    Original URL path: http://hcs.com.sg/v2/index.php/info/view_news/build-your-employment-strategy-ahead-of-2015-launch-of-asean-economic-community (2012-12-22)
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  • Human Capital Singapore
    about 100 000 Mr Lee says He points out that the Government has provided support in the form of Special Employment Credits for some of these groups of potential workers Mr Lee also urges employers to enhance efforts to raise productivity tap the diverse segments of the labour market to meet their manpower needs as well as upgrade low wage service jobs towards achieving sustainable inclusive growth Mr Lee pledges to strengthen tripartite efforts to help low wage workers benefit from economic growth and higher productivity He urges companies that out source their services to adopt best sourcing instead of cheap sourcing Create Human Resource Strategies Aligned with Business Needs Provide Human Resource Information Recruit and Select Staff for International Assignments Ensure Compliance with Relevant Laws and Regulations Align Human Resource Services with Business Needs Issue 008 HCS Bytes Lessons hard pressed employers should not ignore 17 12 2012 The SMRT mainland Chinese drivers strike has placed in the spotlight several issues that many hard pressed businesses might not have paid heed to in the tight labour environment in Singapore in which they are doing all they can just to recruit staff to fill vacancies more Minister of State for

    Original URL path: http://hcs.com.sg/v2/index.php/info/view_news/snef-president-exhorts-employers-to-make-singaporeans-their-mainstay-staff (2012-12-22)
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  • Human Capital Singapore
    is not much better at 60 The narrowest gaps are in Malaysia and Singapore at 81 and Mongolia and Thailand at just under 80 Globally women s pay is 20 to 30 less than men s on average As far as women in senior corporate positions Japan comes in worst in the region with just 5 of those positions held by women Thailand and the Philippines rank highest in this regard with women holding 39 of senior level positions while India came in at 14 and China 25 says the report citing a survey by human resources consultancy Grant Thornton International The percentage of women on corporate boards is much lower with Japan at 0 9 South Korea at 1 9 and China at 8 5 New Zealand ranks highest at 9 3 The global average is 21 On a brighter note the report also says that Asia s rising prosperity has narrowed the gender gap in many countries and bodes positively for the future rise of women leaders This implies that the women of Asia can leverage rising personal endowments as well as increasing structural opportunities for future leadership These create an impetus that will help change dominant perceptions of women as subordinate to and or less competent than men However it says that concrete measures are needed to address the leaking pipeline i e many women opt out of their professions when facing the transition from middle to senior levels of management In one survey the percentages of women dropping out in the transition from middle to senior level management are as high as 70 24 Japan 52 88 China 48 83 Hong Kong SAR China and 45 90 Singapore More systematic support is needed to facilitate women s choice to persevere in their professional lives without giving

    Original URL path: http://hcs.com.sg/v2/index.php/info/view_news/asia-loses-out-on-productivity-by-overlooking-women (2012-12-22)
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  • Human Capital Singapore
    April between CSC and HCS with Mr Roger Tan Assistant CEO of CSC and Mdm Ho Geok Choo CEO of HCS inking the agreement on behalf of their respective sides Mr Wong Hong Kuan Chief Executive of the Workforce Development Agency WDA also officiated at the event at which more than 20 people were present Mdm Ho said WSQ is a great brand that is befitting of the civil service Topping this what is offered at HCS is HCS WSQ rather than any HR WSQ she added pointing out that HCS is very much in the CET Continued Education and Training ecosystem and helps to level up human capability In his turn Mr Tan said Currently CSC already offers a number of WSQ courses which we developed ourselves In this particular instance he added referring to the alliance with HCS we realise that there is no need to reinvent the wheel We ll work together to add some degree of customisation We believe this will be a good partnership going forward Develop and Implement Change Management Strategies and Plans Participate In A Work Team Manage Payroll Manage Organisational Risks Analyse and Present Research Information Issue 008 HCS Bytes Lessons hard

    Original URL path: http://hcs.com.sg/v2/index.php/info/view_news/civil-servants-headed-for-hcs-for-training (2012-12-22)
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